About

Wolf Patrol is a conservation movement founded on the principles of biocentricity, and indigenous cultural preservation. We believe in supporting the recovery of gray wolves in the lower 48 states and encouraging a greater understanding and tolerance for cultural world views that promote a harmonious co-existence with wolves and other predators.

Yellowstone Wolf PatrolIn accordance with the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation (NAMWC), we strongly advocate for wildlife being a public trust resource, that belongs to no one human demographic, but to the entire biological community.

Wolf Patrol recognizes the invaluable role citizens play in contributing to the development of wolf management policies that reflect the interests of all citizen stakeholders, not just hunters and trappers.

Our mission is to advance the reform of wolf management in states where gray wolves are classified as game animals, and help ensure the continued recovery of gray wolves in suitable native habitat where they once roamed.

Wolf Patrol supports Citizen Monitoring Programs (CMP’s) whereby members engage in the witnessing and documentation of public wolf management practices such as hunting and trapping on public lands, for the purpose of educating and exposing the recreational killing of gray wolves.

Where gray wolves remain on the federal list of endangered species, Wolf Patrol has also utilized reward programs to encourage members of the public to come forward with information on the illegal killing of wolves with the aim of ultimately discouraging and preventing wildlife poaching.

Wolf Patrol is a tactic, not an organization. We hope to encourage the use of citizen monitoring of public wildlife policies as a means towards exposing bad wolf policies, and using such documentation to empower citizens to become active in the reform of state wildlife agency policies. Wolf Patrol engages in community outreach and education to share strategy ideas and tactics, and information about the ecological importance of wolves and other predators.

10725095_1493104270944867_1467065457_nWolf Patrol formally recognizes that every indigenous nation in the Great Lakes region opposes the slaughter of wolves, and supports the recognition of religious and cultural practices which recognize the gray wolf as not only biologically necessary, but also a sacred component of the ecosystem in which they belong.

Lastly, Wolf Patrol is not an anti-hunting organization. We are opposed to the hunting, trapping and killing of gray wolves on public lands, while recognizing that the preservation of gray wolves in the wild cannot happen without the support of sportsmen & women who recreate on public lands. Wolf Patrol is also opposed to hound hunting practices in the Great Lakes region that adversely effects the survival of gray wolves in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan.

News articles about Wolf Patrol:

Vice News: Animal Rights Activists Target Wisconsin’s Annual Grey Wolf Hunt

Black and Green Review: The Resilience of the Wild: Talking and Stalking Wolves with Rod Coronado

10 thoughts on “About

  1. Please update 501(c)(3) status whenever you can tell us about changes to the
    org.
    Also please let us know somehow if Wolf Patrol will establish some
    patrols in Idaho anywhere, along with the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem
    area (southern MT Eastern ID, and down the Hoback and Wind River areas).

    There is considerable science showing that human take of carnivores is
    not sustainable or useful and in fact counterproductive, having effects
    opposite to the intent:
    Two studies, one on cougars in 2009 and one covering 25 years on wolves
    in 2014, showed conclusively that shooting these species has caused
    increased conflict/predation of livestock. There are sound behavioral
    and developmental reasons for this. Look up rob Wielgus et al. to find
    those.
    He’s a carnivore biologist working for an agricultural college, whose
    career is involved with assisting knowledge about how to improve
    livestock…

    As you know, wolf populations are controlled by prey populations –
    THAT’S the science, and not the other way around in spite of
    hunting-lobby false propaganda. Ungulate populations, unless extremely
    low, are controlled by variable like winter length, weather, and human
    take, along with human ecosystem influence.
    Sometimes ungulate pops vary in an area due to ecological successional
    changes – fires create temporarily improved elk habitat, which changes
    to stronger deer habitat as the trees and forest returns. In deep
    forest, of course, there is far lower ungulate presence.
    This happened out in the Lolo area of Clearwater NF in Idaho (with which
    I’m far more familiar than Wisconsin), and even though ID had increased
    elk across the state that single area elk population dropped due to
    reforestation – NOT wolves…

    Over in Oregon, I presented the commissioners with material showing that
    public hunting of wolves is the most unwise form of attempt at
    management, and that the entire idea of hunting as wildlife management
    is flawed and unworkable. There’s an increasing amount of science on
    that, as well as material refuting the North American Model of Wildlife
    Management promoted, it turns out, b y a Canadian who has an extreme
    bias against wolves.
    Most conservation organizations are involved in litigation after the
    fact of starting hunting on the small numbers of wolves, griz, cougars –
    it is time that the culture begins to recognize that human
    pleasure-killing is both ecologically deleterious and psychologically
    destructive – glad you are doing what you’re doing back there.. (I also
    learned to hunt as a child, and have seen how failing to adhere to
    indigenous respect and reverence for the lives taken, has made the
    present society pathological.)

    Like

  2. Please update 501(c)(3) status whenever you can tell us about changes to the
    org.
    Also please let us know somehow if Wolf Patrol will establish some
    patrols in Idaho anywhere, along with the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem
    area (southern MT Eastern ID, and down the Hoback and Wind River area).

    There is considerable science showing that human take of carnivores is
    not sustainable or useful and in fact counterproductive, having effects
    opposite to the intent:
    Two studies, one on cougars in 2009 and one covering 25 years on wolves
    in 2014, showed conclusively that shooting these species has caused
    increased conflict/predation of livestock. There are sound behavioral
    and developmental reasons for this. Look up rob Wielgus et al. to find
    those.
    He’s a carnivore biologist working for an agricultural college, whose
    career is involved with assisting knowledge about how to improve
    livestock…

    As you know, wolf populations are controlled by prey populations –
    THAT’S the science, and not the other way around in spite of
    hunting-lobby false propaganda. Ungulate populations, unless extremely
    low, are controlled by variable like winter length, weather, and human
    take, along with human ecosystem influence.
    Sometimes ungulate pops vary in an area due to ecological successional
    changes – fires create temporarily improved elk habitat, which changes
    to stronger deer habitat as the trees and forest returns. In deep
    forest, of course, there is far lower ungulate presence.
    This happened out in the Lolo area of Clearwater NF in Idaho (with which
    I’m far more familiar than Wisconsin), and even though ID had increased
    elk across the state that single area elk population dropped due to
    reforestation – NOT wolves…

    Over in Oregon, I presented the commissioners with material showing that
    public hunting of wolves is the most unwise form of attempt at
    management, and that the entire idea of hunting as wildlife management
    is flawed and unworkable. There’s an increasing amount of science on
    that, as well as material refuting the North American Model of Wildlife
    Management promoted, it turns out, b y a Canadian who has an extreme
    bias against wolves.
    Most conservation organizations are involved in litigation after the
    fact of starting hunting on the small numbers of wolves, griz, cougars –
    it is time that the culture begins to recognize that human
    pleasure-killing is both ecologically deleterious and psychologically
    destructive – glad you are doing what you’re doing back there.. (I also
    learned to hunt as a child, and have seen how failing to adhere to
    indigenous respect and reverence for the lives taken, has made the
    present society pathological.)

    Like

  3. I’ve been researching wolf recovery in the United States for over twenty-five years now and I see absolutely no reason for wolf “management”. Wolves have barely eked out a foothold on 5% of their former range, and in states like Idaho they’ve been nearly wiped out after Congress rammed their despicable legislation/last minute riders through that enabled THEM to disabled the ESA protections, instead of biologists or anyone even remotely qualified to weigh in on the irresponsibility of this action. Wolves keep their populations in check according to prey populations, and in areas where they’ve reclaimed their former range most of the indigenous wildlife actually BENEFIT from their presence. Prey population declines are caused by disease outbreaks or HUMAN hunters, that much I’ve taken away from the biologists that I’ve referenced.

    Like

  4. I am a hunter, and I agree that the shameless killing of animals should be stopped. I do not feel that laws and regulations should be set by either hunters or animal rights activists, but by the biologists that work everyday to study and understand wildlife interactions. With that being said, wolf populations do need to be managed correctly. Talk to a BIOLOGIST, and have an open mind, open to the facts that they know. Please don’t stop at just one, talk to many biologists and hopefully you will then understand that with increased wolf populations comes a decrease in prey populations. In some cases when the wolf population becomes to large to manage, like in portions of Idaho and Montana, Deer, Elk, Coyote, Rabbit, etc., populations get decimated. We have the unique ability to control and manage these populations to a successful and sustainable balance.

    Like

    • In 2005, Sen. Kohl (who was then the ranking member of the agriculture appropriations subcommittee) included in the FY 2006 agriculture appropriations bill $1,750,000 in funding for WI DNR’s Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) eradication efforts. This money did not help eradicate CWD among Wisconsin’s wild deer population. At present there is no cure, nor do we even know the cause of CWD, what steps to take to eradicate it or how to prevent it.

      -infected deer and elk in Wisconsin may pose a threat to human health (and may ultimately threaten the hunting-based economy in our state) — yet the DNR wants to allow wolf hunts.

      Wolves must not be hunted for any reason. The ability of wolf packs to cull the state’s sick deer population means that Wisconsin’s wild wolf population may actually be helping to protect our lives.
      Five things we know:

      1) CWD prions (the protein that transmits disease) persist in soil for up to three years (as a deer carcass decomposes, for example) and remain capable of transmitting disease. The prion is found in muscle, feces, brain, spine, spleen, lymph and eyes (and possibly other organs) of victims, human and otherwise.
      http://www.cwd-info.org/index.php/fuseaction/recommendations.questions

      2) The risk to humans increases if the prion exhibits an adaptation; i.e., if inter-species transmission occurs. When five elk from a small number of elk newly re-introduced into Wisconsin died of CWD (although all media reports described it as “a tick-borne disease”) — that was an adaptation, resulting in a strain that may be unique to Wisconsin.
      http://thepoliticalenvironment.blogspot.com/2015/05/elk-brought-to-breed-for-wi-hunt-five.html

      3) CWD is easily transmitted “horizontally” — i.e., within populations of wild elk and deer in the environment.

      4) http://www.mad-cow.org/00/jul00_late_news.html#ccc (This Isthmus article was published in 2000, a dozen years before the DNR identified infected deer in Marathon and Grant counties.)

      5) The risk to human health will progressively increase with the spread of CWD (and CWD spreads most easily in “hunting farms” — but also anywhere deer are found).
      http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/documents/farmmap.pdf

      Mistakes in animal management decisions are not inconsequential, and must be corrected. Human-caused activity that stresses already threatened wild animal populations should not be permitted. For example, most neck and leg traps that expose wild animals to attacks by packs of dogs cannot be described as “less harmful.” In my opinion dog hunting should not be tolerated in light of evidence that roaming dog packs continue to run down and torture trapped animals (including protected wolf populations) throughout the year. This activity must be prohibited by law, and those dogs’ owners prosecuted.

      The DNR must rescind decisions that allow such unacceptable and immoral, anti-wildlife activity in Wisconsin. The DNR should be working to defend Wisconsin’s wild animals against such abuse and deadly harm. Wolves are important predators of wild deer and as such each wolf pack in Wisconsin is essential for a balanced and healthy ecosystem. The DNR should be working to protect wolves as well as working to develop deer management plans that halt the epidemic of chronic wasting disease (CWD) that is decimating the deer population (and is also killing elk) in Wisconsin. The state must not permit wolf hunts.

      I urge everyone who respects wild nature to spread this message widely: Stop hunting with dog packs; stop all hunting of wolves; keep wolves listed as endangered.

      We must speak up for the Wolves, Sandhill Cranes, Long-Eared Owls and all the fish, fowl and wild living beings without whom much of life’s wonder and balance, formerly present in Wisconsin, could be gone forever.

      Sent to:
      The Honorable Scott Walker
      Office of the Governor
      115 East State Capitol
      Madison, WI 53702

      Secretary Cathy Stepp, WI DNR
      101 South Webster Street
      Madison, WI 53707

      sawyer.briel@wisconsin.gov (wildlife management)
      kevin.harter@wisconsin.gov (northwest public affairs manager)

      Like

    • There is a vast and growing amount of science showing that
      1. The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation – use of public hunting to manage wildlife, is ineffective and counterproductive. Considerable critical literature is rising on this inaccurate an d flawed unscientific and inaccurate presentation of History (for those of you knowing of the history, Valerius Geist, the promoter, although a wildlife biologist from Russia, is demonstrably anti-wolf. Explore the source of this fallacious idea.
      2. Wolf populations REDUCE loss of the small mammals mentioned, as wolves have been long known to suppress coyote and other mesopredator populations, allowing prey species to return to numbers which result in other lost predators, such as golden eagles , owls, and others to return to habitats long destroyed by human hunting and poaching.
      3. The mistaken idea of predators driving prey numbers has also been proven inaccurate (only when prey have been driven by human habitat conversion and exploitation, have predators any real danger of reducing further those prey. In SW BC for instance, the caribou loss was DIRECTLY due to human roads in wildlands allowing poachers, ATVs, snowmobiles, to penetrate formerly inaccessible areas. The caribou withdraw from the human encroachment. Additionally, the gas drilling corporations employed numerous men who poached this animal, The ACTUAL remedy is to close public lands roads, decommission forest service logging roads, enact stronger laws preventing abuse by ORVs/Snowmobiles, 4x’s etc.)
      3. I am a tracker and wildlife behavior student, and know well that Idaho is all-too overwhelmed by overly motorized “sport” hunters. A huge amount of undocumented poaching occurs. In that state and MT /WY, the PLoS 1 meta-analysis of Rob Wielgus et al. proved that the wolf hunting IS driving increased livestock predation. The 25% population target both will inevitably lead to wolf extinction, along with promoting the HIGHEST increase in livestock/wolf conflict.

      A mere perusal of the peer-reviewed science on the subject claimed in the inaccurate comment posted above this, will show tha tevery assertion is false.
      It appears that this comment column needs critical review. Should you desire to do this, Please contact me, and I will supply the massive scientific literature supporting my contention on that comment.
      Due to time constraints.

      Like

    • Alex, I am an evolutionary ecologist. And I can assure you that healthy, sustainable ecosystems do not require human intervention. Wildlife biologists whose jobs are solely to interfere with natural processes may be trained to see their role of handing out unlimited permits as somehow necessary, but these animals have managed themselves for millions of years before say, FWP came along to cater to recreational killers above all.

      Any biologist who may tell you critters depend upon *us* for the balance of *their* populations, lacks a fundamental misunderstanding of biology itself. And is a damn fool. We do however, have to manage ourselves and our harmful activities… And that is what it is all about.

      Wildlife management is an oxymoron. It’s about giving out all the licenses in the world & if clients can’t bag a kill? Then let them bait & trap, because increasing the chances of a happy hunter is what it is all about. That’s management. Really. Try to kill, kill, kill and if you still can’t succeed? Well then, what can we do to help with that? We’re wildlife management and we are here to serve *you*!

      No animal has EVER needed humans to kill them for their population to succeed. Ever. That’s the epitome of the most certified bullshit ever conceived. Clearly. And it boggles the mind, how easily some may think that we humans are needed, needed to kill critters. For the critters good? Bullsh*t.

      Like

  5. Thank you, thank you, thank you!! I have prayed for an organization like this to be formed–if I lived ANYWHERE near Wisconsin (UGH!) I would volunteer to join you. Right now I can only support with $$.
    Kudos to everyone who is involved!

    Like

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