Wolf Patrol’s Trail Camera on Contested National Forest Bear Bait Site

Back in early June 2018, Wolf Patrol began its annual investigation of bear baiting and hound training activities in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, focusing on areas of Forest County where multiple wolf packs occur. This is the fourth year Wolf Patrol has been monitoring and documenting bear hunting practices like baiting and hound training in known wolf areas. Our evidence shows bear baiting and bear hound training, especially in summer months, contributes heavily to what has become the annual killing and injuring of hunting dogs by wolves in northern Wisconsin.

Beginning on June 7, Wolf Patrol monitors began surveying national forest roads for active and inactive bear bait locations. Our focus area was determined by over-winter activity of at least three separate wolf groups our members have tracked since 2016. The focus of this year’s investigation is once again, the connection between bear hunting activities and wolf depredations on hunting dogs, which always increases with the beginning of bear hound training season in July.

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Wolf at Windsor Dam Road bait site, 06/29/18 (incorrect trail cam date)

In addition to Wolf Patrol documenting the presence of wolves in this portion of Forest County, in early June, biologists from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) were also live-trapping wolves in the immediate area for radio-collaring and monitoring.

On June 8th, Wolf Patrol investigators set up trail cameras to monitor bear and wolf activity at four historic bait sites on national forest lands in our research area. The first was a bait site off of Windsor Dam Road, the second was a site south of Fire Tower Road off Highway 55, the third at another Highway 55 bait site, and the fourth off of Fire Tower Road itself.

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Bear Bait sites monitored by Wolf Patrol June- July 2018.

When Wolf Patrol returned to the area on June 28, the trail camera monitoring one of the active baits off Highway 55 was missing. All other trail cameras were operational and recording wildlife activity at the inactive bait sites. On June 29, we repositioned two of our trail cameras at the Fire Tower Road bait site and placed a single bagel in the bait log. By placing the cameras and bait at this location, Wolf Patrol was claiming this site as our own, as is permitted by WDNR regulations. To avoid violating rules on recreational feeding of bears, we secured a commitment from a sympathetic bear hunter to use our baits during the fall hunting season.

On June 30, the Fire Tower Road bait site was visited by an unknown bear baiter who took over the bait site and removed the trail camera monitoring Wolf Patrol’s bait site. The next day on July 1, opening day of Wisconsin’s bear hound training season, another trail camera monitoring the road at the same bait site was also stolen.

FCSD II

Forest County Sheriff’s deputy investigating trail camera theft.

All three camera thefts were reported to Forest County Sheriff’s Department (FCSD) on July 1st and U.S. Forest law enforcement and WDNR conservation officers were also notified. ON July 2, Wolf Patrol provided FCSD with additional trail camera images of the bear baiter continuing to use the Fire Tower Road bait site. On July 5, I was contacted by WDNR conservation officers who informed me that they identified the bear hunter using the site and had located our stolen cameras.

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Wolf Patrol includes licensed hunters who have just as much right to occupy bear baits and use trail cameras to monitor wildlife activity as other licensed bear hunters. Whether we kill animals or not, our constitutional rights as citizens and hunters are the same as the bear hunters we monitor.

Illegal activity associated with bear baiting is not uncommon. Over the last four years, Wolf Patrol has reported multiple violations of bear baiting regulations on national forest lands in northern Wisconsin. Also in early July, we spoke with other bear baiters in the area who reported that individual(s) were tampering with their baits by pouring gasoline over their contents.

 

 

The simplest solution to avoiding conflicts at bear baiting sites on public lands is for WDNR to require the registration of the sites with conservation officers, and placing a limit on the number of baits a hunter can use. Requiring bear bait registration would not only make enforcing baiting regulations much easier, it would also create a revenue stream for WDNR that could be used to help enforce Wisconsin’s huge black bear hunt.

If you believe that bear baiting practice on our national forest lands need to change, please get involved and send an email to Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest officials asking for bear baiting and hound training to be re-evaluated because of the many conflicts it causes, with bears, wolves and other forest users.

SEND YOUR EMAIL NOW TO US FOREST OFFICIALS!!!

cnnfadmin@fs.fed.us

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Hound hunter passing Fire Tower Road bait site.

REPORTED BEAR BAITING VIOLATIONS TO WDNR VIOLATION HOTLINE

On August 10, Wolf Patrol citizen monitors began visiting sites where federally protected gray wolves have clashed with bear hounds during Wisconsin’s 2018 summer bear hound training season. So far, ten deadly fights have been reported since training season began on July 1st. Six bear hounds have been killed and eight injured.

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Because a license is no longer required to bait for bear or train hunting dogs to chase them during the summer training season, Wisconsin’s Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) doesn’t know how many bear baits are used by hunters or how many dogs are chasing bears in Wisconsin, mostly on county, state and national forest lands.

But WDNR, bear hunters and Wolf Patrol all know that almost all conflicts between bear hounds and wolves during the training season occur in areas with a high density of bear baits and hound training activity. Intentionally baiting for bears also attracts wolves, who have been documented this summer feeding from bear baits in northern Wisconsin: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrlIlGGYdQM&t=8s

 

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Running hounds from and near bait sites after bears have become conditioned to feeding from them, also means wolves will view the hounds as trespassers in their feeding grounds, and attack the often young and unsuspecting bear hounds. In addition, Wisconsin’s summer training season happens when wolves are taking young pups away from their dens for the first time and are protective and territorial to packs of loose dogs running through these wolf “rendezvous areas”.

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On August 11, Wolf Patrol monitors visited the site where wolves killed a 9-month old bear hound on July 29, 2018 in Sawyer County, Wisconsin and found four active bear baits in the Wolf Caution Area, two of which were out of compliance with WDNR bear baiting regulations.

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Later the same morning, WP monitors visited the site where wolves injured an 8-year old bear hound on July 28, 2018 in Douglas County, Wisconsin and found two more active bear baits in the Wolf Caution Area, both of which were out of compliance with WDNR bear baiting regulations.

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On August 12, WP monitors visited the site where wolves injured a 4-year old bear hound on July 29, 2018 in Burnett County, Wisconsin and found four active bear baits in the Wolf Caution Area, three of which were out of compliance with WDNR bear baiting regulations.

OELTJEN RD BAIT II

Wolf Patrol is certain that its monitors did not find all the bear baits out of compliance in these three particular WDNR designated Wolf Caution Areas. But as we have documented in past bear hound training seasons, hound hunters who don’t care about dogs being killed, are more likely to also not observe Wisconsin’s minimal requirements for bear baiting.

OELTJEN RD BAIT

Whether in compliance with baiting regulations or not, there is still undeniable evidence that summer bear baiting and bear hound training activity is the cause for the annual violent conflict between wolves and hunting dogs in Wisconsin.

THE FOLLOWING IS THE ACTUAL WOLF PATROL REPORT FILED WITH WDNR’S VIOLATOR HOTLINE 08/14/18:

Dear Officers,
On my recent drive over this past weekend (08/10-12/18) through WDNR designated wolf caution areas, I found six active bear baits that I believe are out of compliance with the requirement to be at least 50 yards from public roads. All the baits were measured from the established public roads we were driving on when we found the baits in county forest lands.

I was in these areas as a matter of interest, to document active bear baiting and hound training continuing in wolf caution areas. I was only in all of these areas for a very short time and am sure I would have found more baits out of compliance had I had the time to look. I wanted to visit all the existing wolf caution areas in Oneida, Sawyer, Douglas, Burnett and Bayfield counties, so only was at each for a couple hours.

Nonetheless, I believe its likely that whoever is responsible for these baits reported, might also have other baits in these areas out of compliance, based on their not adhering to the 50 yard limit. Its of great concern to me that such a disregard for minimal regulation is taking place in areas that the DNR is already instructing hunters to use caution. Anyhow, thanks for your service!

If any of your CO’s have any questions, they are welcome to email or phone me at: XXX XXX XXXX.

Thank You,
Rod Coronado

Sawyer County baits out of compliance are south of the town of Winter, and off County Road W, just West of Tower Road, on the first open gated road on the south:

1.) 45 46′ 1″ N 90 56′ 13″ W
100 feet from the road.

2.) 45 44′ 42″ N 90 57′ 52″ W
60 feet from the road.

Douglas County bait out of compliance is in West of Gordon, off of South Mail Road and off unmarked Arnold Road:

1.) 46 16′ 38″ N 91 56′ 36″ W
30 feet from the road.

Burnett County bear baits out of compliance are south of Grantsburg, and south of the intersection of County Road O and Johnson Road:

1.) 45 40′ 43″ N 92 47′ 59″ W
33 feet from the road.

2.) 45 40′ 13″ N 92 48′ 17″ W
90 feet from the road.

3.) 45 39′ 41″ 92 48′ 54″ W
32 feet from the road.

CB3 BEAR 7.26.18

OPPOSED TO BEAR BAITING & HOUND TRAINING ON WISCONSIN PUBLIC LANDS?

SEND COMMENTS TO DNR OFFICIALS:

Wisconsin Natural Resources Board (all board members):

Laurie.Ross@wisconsin.gov

Wisconsin DNR Secretary:

DNRSecretary@wisconsin.gov

Wisconsin DNR Secretary’s Director for Northern Wisconsin:

JamesA.Y@wisconsin.gov

REPORT VIOLATIONS

Continued Hound Training & Illegal Baits Found in Burnett County Wolf Caution Area

From August 10 through the 12th, Wolf Patrol took a tour of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) designated Wolf Caution Areas (WCA’S), where federally protected wolves have injured or killed bear hounds being trained to chase bears, all on public lands since bear hound training season began on July 1st.

As part of a larger investigation in current Wolf Caution Areas across northern Wisconsin, Wolf Patrol is documenting and reporting on the bear baiting and hound training activities that continue, despite the injuries and deaths to hounds that have already been reported in those areas.

DEP AREA

Both videos in this post were filmed where the red dot is located, and the hound was injured.

On August 12, Wolf Patrol visited a WCA in Burnett County, Wisconsin, where on July 29, 2018 wolves injured a 4 year-old bear hound. In less than an hour, we discovered 4 active bear baits within a half-mile of the depredation site. Our patrol also caught the attention of local bear hunters who confirmed over the radio that the hound attack took place in this immediate area. One hound hunter also asked Wolf Patrol for free dog bells, which we provided.

Wolf Patrol’s monitors investigating bear baiting and hound training activities in this WCA earlier in the day discovered four active bear baits, three of them out of compliance with WDNR regulations which stipulate that bear baits must be at least 50 yards away from public roads and trails.

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Bear hound in Burnett County Wolf Caution Area 08/12/18

The evidence we find says that bear hunters themselves are contributing to the problem by first intentionally baiting wildlife like bears, that in turn attracts prey animals, which can attract wolves. (Last month we published video from this Summer showing wolves feeding from bear baits in northern Wisconsin.) Secondly, hound hunters using bait sites to attract bears their dogs can then chase, instead are creating sites wolves will defend as feeding sites, leading to many attacks near bear baits on bear hounds.

Wolf Caution Areas are mostly designated during the bear hound training season, when an unlimited number of hounds are being trained to chase bears in Wisconsin. The WDNR does not require any license to train dogs or bait for bear, which also attracts many hound trainers and bear baiters from out of state.

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Bear baiters and hound hunters in Burnett County Wolf Caution Area 08/12/18

Some hounders will intentionally run their dogs in Wolf Caution Areas, knowing that if they are killed or injured, they are then eligible for up to $2,500.00 in compensation from Wisconsin’s Endangered Species Fund. In 2016, over $60,000 was paid out to hounders for injured or killed hunting hounds. Continuing to run your dogs in Wolf Caution Areas does not disqualify hounders from compensation either.

Wolf Patrol is calling for a cessation of bear hound training and bear baiting in areas where fights between federally protected wolves and bear hounds have already occurred this summer. Throughout the remainder of Wisconsin’s bear hound training season, and into the actual kill season for bear which runs through October, Wolf Patrol will continue investigating bear baiting and hound training activities in WDNR designated Wolf Caution Areas.

It’s not a pro versus anti-hunting debate, its about preventing deadly conflicts between wildlife and humans. Neither is it a request for policy change, in so much as a call for wildlife and public officials to do the right thing to protect not only wolves or hounds, but everyone’s best interests.

Prevent deadly conflicts between bear hounds and wolves. Stop bear baiting and hound training in Wisconsin Wolf Caution Areas!

CB3 BEAR 7.26.18

OPPOSED TO BEAR BAITING & HOUND TRAINING ON WISCONSIN PUBLIC LANDS?

SEND COMMENTS TO DNR OFFICIALS:

Wisconsin Natural Resources Board (all board members):

Laurie.Ross@wisconsin.gov

Wisconsin DNR Secretary:

DNRSecretary@wisconsin.gov

Wisconsin DNR Secretary’s Director for Northern Wisconsin:

JamesA.Y@wisconsin.gov

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WOLF DEPREDATIONS ON BEAR HOUNDS VISIT WDNR WOLF PAGE AT: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/wildlifehabitat/wolf/dogdeps.html

TO SUPPORT WOLF PATROL’S CALL FOR AN END TO BEAR BAITING AND HOUND TRAINING IN THE CHEQUAMEGON-NICOLET NATIONAL FOREST AND WDNR WOLF CAUTION AREAS,

PLEASE SEND EMAILS: cnnfadmin@fs.fed.us

 

Wisconsin’s Bear Hunters Again Throwing Their Dogs to the Wolves…

On July 29th, 2018, Wisconsin’s Department of Natural Resources reported the eighth incident where wolves injured or killed a hunting hound since bear hound training season began on July 1st. So far in 2018, there have been ten violent encounters between federally protected gray wolves and free-roaming hunting hounds, resulting in at least 11 dogs being injured and four killed.

DEPS SO FAR

January-July 2018 Wolf Depredations of Hunting Hounds.

Once a fight between wolves and bear hounds has been reported and verified by federal USDA Wildlife Services officers, the WDNR will designate a four-mile radius around the location as a Wolf Caution Area. Unfortunately, many hound hunters will continue to run their dogs in these areas, leading to repeat attacks in the very same Wolf Caution Areas.

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2015-2018 Wolf Depredations on Hunting Hounds.

Since 2015, Wolf Patrol’s investigations into bear hunting practices in known Wolf Caution Areas has repeatedly discovered high densities of bear baiting sites wherever depredations have occurred. A number of scientific studies have concluded that wolves are attracted to bear baits, because deer and other prey will often feed from the sites as well, leading the wolves to identify bear baits as hunting areas worth defending from intruding bear hounds.

7.22.18 DEP

Three of eight July 2018 Wolf depredations on bear hounds.

Also, Wolf Patrol’s field investigations over the last four years have revealed that many Wolf Caution Areas are established after bear hounds have trespassed wolf rendezvous sites where young pups are more vulnerable. WDNR advises hound hunters to use caution in Wolf Caution Areas, but bear baiting and hound training is still allowed to continue. Resident and non-resident unlicensed hound hunters are compensated up to $2,500.00 for each hound killed or injured by wolves in Wisconsin, even when they have already been paid for depredations in the very same Wolf Caution Area.

SANCI POST

Facebook post about 7/28/18 wolf depredation.

In 2015, the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association (WBHA) was responsible for pressuring state politicians to repeal the “B” license requirement to bait for bear or train dogs to chase them, which occurs mostly on public lands in Wisconsin. Since then, anyone can come to Wisconsin and allow their packs of hounds to chase bears and other wildlife. Remember, the bear hound training season is just that, a training season. Most of the dogs being loosed are six-month old pups, learning how to chase and harass bears. Many commercial dog trainers are paid to bring dogs to Wisconsin, because of the virtual lack of any requirement for a license to train dogs on public lands.

HOUND 2

Hound injured in 7/28/18 depredation in Douglas County, Wisconsin.

While bear hunters releasing young hounds into known Wolf Caution Areas are clearly the ones responsible for the conflicts between wolves and bear hounds, the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association and other unethical hounders argue that depredations can only be prevented when wolves are no longer protected and can be legally hunted, including with hounds. Wisconsin is the only state in the nation where wolves can be run down with hounds, when not protected by the federal law, as has been the case since December 2014.

LADIES!

Real hunters don’t start dog fights.

With the full month of August bear hound training, and the actual hound hunt for bear in September and October still to come, more deadly fights between wolves and bear hounds are sure to occur.

If you agree that its time to end the practices of bear baiting and bear hound training in our national forests, please send an email comment to Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest officials at:

cnnfadmin@fs.fed.us

or

https://www.fs.usda.gov/contactus/cnnf/about-forest/contactus

CB3 BEAR 7.26.18

Commercial Hounders Harassing Bears Without Restriction in Our National Forests

Wisconsin’s unregulated two-month bear hound training season is continuing to create a disaster for wildlife in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. Not only are black bears repeatedly chased in hot summer weather, often with young cubs, but they are becoming addicted to sugary human food waste hounders use as bear bait. Beginning July 1st, hound hunters from across the nation flock to Wisconsin to take full advantage of their ability to train bear hounds without a license. According to the last known survey of bear hunters in 2014, over 4 million gallons of bear bait and over 15,000 dogs were used to aid in the hunting of bears in Wisconsin.

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An ad from Bob’s Bear Bait in Appleton, WI

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) has no idea how many hound hunters are training their dogs to chase bears this and every Summer. Nor is there anyway to determine just how much bear bait is being dumped in our national forests and other public lands, as both baiting and training for bear hunters does not require any license or registration. Anyone can dump hundreds of gallons of bear bait in the forest, as long as it is used to aid a licensed bear hunter.

JONET BEAR ON DOG

A black bear fighting with one of Jonet’s hounds during bear hound training season.

Many hound hunters, like Jonet Plotts featured in this video, are commercial operators charging hundreds of dollars to take young pups out to learn how to chase bears. In the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, these commercial hunters are laying waste to our public lands by dumping hundreds of gallons of oil and food waste to attract bears to sites where hounds could then follow. Hound Hunting operators like Jonet Plotts, who are paid to train hounds, should be licensed and regulated to operate in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest.

JONET FB POST ABOUT WP

Jonet 2018 Facebook post about raffling off hound as fundraiser to “fight Wolf Patrol.”

This month, Jonet Plotts also posted photos of an orphaned black bear seen during bear hound training season, which led to Forest County hound hunters encouraging Jonet Plotts to illegally kill the animal, “We need this bear to become your number one priority during kill season, an orphan running the woods alone is nothing but trouble.” said Carl Bailey III of Crandon, Wisconsin, “I hope we can trust in you to take care of this problem in future days.” Another hounder suspected that the bear cub could also be used in illegal ways stating, “Better be careful if it gets out that you’ve got an orphan your gonna have people fighting over it come kill season.”

JONET ORPHAN

JONET ORPHAN POST

And much of Wisconsin’s bear hound training & baiting practices occur in active wolf territory, where the predators are known to consider bear hounds unwelcome trespassers, often killing and eating the offending dogs. Since July 1st, when bear hound training began, there have been three reports of wolves killing and injuring bear hounds as the chased bears through Summer wolf territory. Help Wolf Patrol clean up bear hunting practices on our national forest lands! Its time to call for an end to hunting practices that negatively impact wildlife on our public lands!

Please send your comment to Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest officials at:

cnnfadmin@fs.fed.us

or:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/contact…/cnnf/about-forest/contactus

JONET SHOT BEAR ON ROAD 10.7.17

Guided Jonet bear hunter shooting bear on road in Wisconsin.

Day 8 of Wisconsin’s Bear Hound Training Season in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest…

Wisconsin’s two month bear hound training season continues in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, and Wolf Patrol continues to monitor bear baiting & training activities in known wolf pack territory in Forest County, where Highway 70 cuts through the national forests. On both the northern and southern sides of Hwy 70, bear baits are scattered off US Forest Service roads, many much closer than the legal limit of 50 and 100 yards. From these bait sites, hound hunters are releasing their dogs to chase bears, often across busy roads and highways that intersect this portion of the national forest.

Every day that Wolf Patrol’s monitors have been documenting bear hound training on Highway 70 this month, we have seen hound trucks chasing loose hounds, hoping to catch them before they cross the busy highway where cars travel in excess of 60mph, often braking to avoid hound trucks and hunters on the road’s shoulder.

A very popular bear baiting and hound training area in this part of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest is along Windsor Dam Road, south of Highway 70, and off of Fishel Road, on the northern side of the highway. From both of these roads, hounds are released to trail bears that are often chased onto the busy highway. On July 8th, it was no different, with a bear crossing the highway in front of an unsuspecting speeding motorist.

But its not only creating a conflict with speeding traffic, bear baiting and hound training in this area is a recipe for disaster considering the number of known wolf packs with young pups in this part of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. Not only have bear hounds been killed by wolves, but in recent years, wolves also have been killed and dumped in the area.


Wolf Patrol is opposed to the conflicts created when bear hunters bait and train their dogs in known wolf territory. We’ve documented how wolves are attracted to bait sites, often by the deer and other animals who are also attracted to the artificial feeding sites. We’ve also documented a pattern, whereby the vast majority of wolf/bear hounds conflicts occur on national forest lands where unlimited bear baiting is allowed to also occur.


Bear baiting isn’t only a contributing factor in violent encounters with federally protected gray wolves, its also conditioning and addicting black bears into being fed human food waste that alters the natural behavior of many other wild animals as well.

And not even the Wisconsin’s Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) or the US Forest Service (USFS) knows how many bear baits are being maintained in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. State law does not require a license to bait for bear, as long as its being done for hunting. Also, any bear baiter can place as many baits as they like on national forest lands, and are allowed to dump up to ten gallons of sugary food waste and fryer grease in each one daily, adding up to hundreds of gallons of oil and waste dumped at each site across the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest every year.

Many residents in Forest County, Wisconsin are also opposed to bear baiting and hound training practices because of the trespassing hounds that cross their property, chasing out deer and other wildlife in their blind pursuit of black bear. On July 8th, one such resident informed Wolf Patrol that bear hounds had just come onto Highway 70 and tried to get into his truck as he slowed to avoid them.

We also heard the story on patrol July 8th from a hound hunter operating baits in this area, that someone has been lifting off the lids to his baits and pouring gasoline over the enclosed bait. Wolf Patrol will monitor bear baits on public lands, often measuring their proximity to roads and highways, but we do not otherwise touch, tamper or contaminate bait sites. Nor do we condone anyone else violating the rights of bear hunters to legally practice bear baiting and hound training practices.

Wolf Patrol is opposed to bear baiting and hound training in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, but only through legal means such as monitoring and reporting on the conflicts it causes to wolves and other wildlife, and reporting illegal activity or non-compliant bait sites to WDNR & USFS law enforcement.

We believe we are being reasonable in calling on both WDNR & USFS to:

  • Require the registration of bear baits.
  • Limit the number of bear baits.
  • Ban the use of chocolate in bear baits.
  • Cessation of baiting when wolves begin visiting bear baits.
  • Require a license to bait for bears and train bear hounds on national forest lands.
  • Ban the dumping of grease and other non-biodegradable bear bait ingredients on national forest lands.
  • Stop compensating hound hunters for dogs killed by wolves while chasing bears through known wolf territory.
  • Prohibit the use of hounds within 100 yards of highways with a posted speed limit in excess of 55mph.

These are just a few changes Wolf Patrol will be calling for this Summer as we continue to monitor Wisconsin’s 7 month bear baiting and two-month hound training in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. If you agree that its time to reign in unsafe bear hunting practices on our national forest lands, send an email to forest officials asking for more restrictions on bear hunting activities that create conflicts for wildlife and other human forest users.

TO SEND A COMMENT TO CHEQUAMEGON-NICOLET FOREST OFFICIALS:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/contactus/cnnf/about-forest/contactus

OR EMAIL:

cnnfadmin@fs.fed.us

If You Must Run Your Hounds in Wisconsin Wolf Country…Please Use Dog Bells!

On 07/05/18, USDA’s Wildlife Services confirmed that wolves attacked and injured a Walker hound in Burnett County, Wisconsin. Bear hound trainers are reminded to use caution when running hounds in wolf territory to help reduce conflicts.

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Every year in northern Wisconsin, bear hounds are injured and killed by wolves as they chase bears through summer wolf territory. Wolves with young pups are especially territorial in summer months and can become conditioned to recognizing bear baiting sites as feeding locations.

KETTLEWELL HOUND 8.2.14

Bear hound killed by wolves in 2014…the same hounder lost another hound to a bear this week.

Wolf Patrol offers free dog bells to hound hunters concerned for their dogs safety, while being trained to chase bears in wolf country. Although we are opposed to the practice entirely, we still would like to work with hound hunters running dogs in federally protected gray wolf habitat in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in order to reduce the loss of both wolf and hound lives.

Thanks to Polly Plotts, and the other hound hunters featured in this video for practicing caution by using dog bells in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest.